Posts Tagged ‘MO’

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b.a.l.m. Maps the Kemper: Lines, Dots, and the Spaces In Between

October 18, 2012

Join us for a milieu of dots, lines & spaces
spanned by luminosity!
Your participation will by vital to the event…
Fun & possibly enlightening for all ages!
S
ome inspirations are organic geometry,
biophosphorescence &interactive empowerment
of audience as everyday mapmakers…

Press Release: For Immediate Release

b.a.l.m. Maps the Kemper:
Lines, Dots, and the Spaces In Between
4420 Warwick Boulevard  Kansas City, MO 64111
Friday, October 26th, 2012, 7-9 pm

The lawns of the Kemper Museum will be a glow-in-the-dark
experience led by Lawrence’s artist cooperative
b.a.l.m. (beauty, art and life movement).
Activity stations will revolve around the themes of
RefreshExploreMove.
Find your way to the Kemper Museum to help create an
open-air interactive environment!

We are always creating the map…routing and rerouting our existence with
our movements between resting points,forming beneficial connections
along the way. Streams of creativity and ways of thinking run fluidly parallel
to one another and occasionally converge to illuminate perspectives. In this
context, art makes our neural pathways visible and helps us navigate the
geography between spaces. Our grey cell matter and the dark matter of the
universe become illuminated. We are joining with artists in our network to
awaken the event guests to realize their cumulative role in creating the map
with an engaging experience with light on the lawn of the Kemper.

Maps can be defined as any network formed in nature or culture . At night it
appears as a series of basic phospho -geometric components of circles or
dots, lines & spaces between shapes.These structures, which represent
constellations, bio phosphorescent micellenia networks in the soil between
mushrooms which allow for forestation, cities viewed from space which form
a dimensional structure for life, gleaming waterways or neuro-electric currents
and pathways in our brain become conduits or established pathways that support
functional and desirable ways of life to be traveled and revisited, and can also be
solidified and altered. Memories and relationships are formed at each juncture
and while navigating the unknowns, the dark matter or spaces in between, which
causes the design of the map to be in flux.


BREEZEWAY STATION – REFRESH:

Under the breezeway, artist Katherine Marie O’Hara’s crocheted
monofilament forms have a gift each guest is invited to take from
the suspended glow-in-the-dark elements.This lit wearable object
provides a visual map of your journey between the various stations
creating atrace of your steps and interactions and memory of
your involvement.

Sip a natural soda, kickback and listen to global and experimental
music by the Owl People, around glowing elements/sculptures by
artist Yuri Zupancic.

SOUTH LAWN – MOVEMENT:

Luminescent  artist inside a clear sphere will interact with guests while
mapping the topographic space.

Fiber and performance artist Judah Wagner designed and produced a suit
that in various ways uses multiplecolors of light to map the body.

Event producers, and artists Shannon and Darin White constructed
a collaborative glowing spherical structures  by transforming existing
objects.Guests are encouraged to manipulate and interact with
constructions and artists around the sunken lawn , creating a changing
map piece with the moving points.

NORTH LAWN STATION – EXPLORING:

Artists, Darin and Shannon White 10′ cube frame suspended & connected colored
glow-in-the-dark strings, neon , and glow elements, creating open air sculpture
environment.

Guests interact with the environment along with artists. Glow rope is provided to
use on the lawn as a drawing tool, creating lines, forms and shapes.

Host/ Sponsor:

Producers:
b.a.l.m. beauty, art and life movement

________________________________________

Facebook invite:


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| beauty, art and life movement
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balm is a non profit organization working on 501-3C Status.
If you or an organization or business would like to donate funds, time or
other resources to further art and artists in Lawrence, KS and throughout
the country please send any correspondence to us or donate by clicking the
link below.

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A tribute to GF Sam Wagner

July 12, 2012

One of b.a.l.m.’s good friends and amazing artists passed away July, 5th, 2012.

We remember GF Sam Wagner. Sam has been involved in b.a.l.m. from the beginning and he will be missed greatly.
Sam was in the b.a.l.m. White Show in Lawrence, KS and San Antonio, TX, Anthropoi, Dry Bones, and the Dannon Art Project.
Sam was a wonderful person and artists. Our condolences, and much love to his wife Shelley and three children.

GF SAM WAGNER

Obituary:
GF Sam Wagner, 38, of Overland Park, KS, passed away Thurs., July 5, 2012. He was born on Jan. 26, 1974, in Springfield, MO, the son of Lynn Catherine (Brimeyer) and Galen F. Wagner. Survivors include his wife, Shelley Wagner, and three children. Other survivors include Gilbert and Leone Brimeyer, Laura and Rick Coelho and their children, and Stephanie and Jeremy Jerguson and their children. He will be missed by many other family members and friends. Sam was a dad, a husband, a son, a brother, a grandson, a cousin, an uncle, a nephew, a son-in-law, a brother-in- law, a neighbor, a friend, a soccer coach, an artist, an architect, a Jayhawk, and a Sporting KC fan. He is now a citizen of heaven. Funeral Services will be held at 10 a.m., Fri., July 13, at Evangel Church, 1414 E. 103rd St., KC, MO 64131. Visitation will be held from 6-8 p.m., Thurs., July 12, at the church. Burial will be held in the Shawnee Mission Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to his children’s education may be made to Learning Quest. Fond memories and condolences for the family may be left at www.johnsoncountychapel.com. (Arr: D.W. Newcomer’s Sons Johnson County Chapel, 11200 Metcalf Ave, Overland Park, KS 66210. (913) 451-1860) http://www.dwnewcomers.com

Link to obituary: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/kansascity/obituary.aspx?n=gf-sam-wagner&pid=158471281#storylink=cpy

Images of a few of GF Sam Wagner’s artwork:

GF Sam Wagner, Swoon (Grace Outake), Acrylic and cut paper, Dec 2011

GF Sam Wagner, Little Things I Should Have Said and Done 1 from The Little Things I Should Have Said and Done Series, 2009

GF Sam Wagner, Sam at b.a.l.m. White Show next to his paintings, “Geese” and “Discover and Enjoy”, 2009

GF Sam Wagner with “Awakening” for b.a.l.m. Dry Bones Exhibition, Oct. 2010 (Collection of Darin and Shannon White)

GF Sam Wagner, At work at b.a.l.m. Dannon Art Project, February, 20th, 2012

A few words about Sam by balm Co Founder Darin White
See more of GF Sam Wagner’s artwork here.

If you would like to help the family in this time by sending a memorial, please write the check to Learning Quest for his children’s education fund.
Please reference GF Sam and Shelley Wagner on checks or in a note sent with checks.
Please send checks to:
LearningQuest c/o Walla Street
4745 West 136th Street
Leawood, KS 66224


b.a.l.m.
| beauty, art and life movement
email
http://beautyartandlifemovement.org
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Follow us on:

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balm is a non profit organization working on 501-3C Status.
If you or an organization or business would like to donate funds, time or
other resources to further art and artists in Lawrence, KS and throughout
the country please send any correspondence to us or donate by clicking the
link below.

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Earth: Language and Symbols Opens January 20, 2012 at Cara and Cabezas Contemporary in KC Crossroads District

January 13, 2012

Press Release:

NEW EXHIBITION FOCUSES ON EARTH AS A MEDIUM
_____________________________________________________________________________
Earth: Language and Symbols

Curated by Darin M. White
January 20 – March 10, 2012
Opening: Friday, January 20, 2012, 6-9 pm
From the earth we emerge and we return to the earth.
We explore our world and grasp to adequately describe through language and
symbols who we are and why. Through sculpted clay, compressed burned trees
and dried pulp, minerals retrieved and many other ways we reach out to speak
about the space that we inhabit as we gaze into the heavens. While it may sound
mundane, in actuality there is life at it’s fullest to be explored, and held in our
open hands for however long we are given. This exhibition, featuring work by
Rex Hausmann and Jimmy Greenfield, attempts to dig deep into these notions
through material, action, thought and image.
– Darin M. White, Guest Curator

______________________________________________________________________________

Universal Language: Rex Hausmann

Universal Language will exhibit a water painting performance, slide-show,
photographs, and drawings from a recent sojourn to Beijing and Hong Kong.
These elements explore an interaction the artist had with a calligraphy master
at the Temple of Heaven where he found that across many cultural barriers,
the two were able to bridge their varying cultural experiences by
communicating through brush and line. Additionally, Universal Language
will include an installation entitled Where There Is Land There Is War,
equating historical events that occurred at the Boston Common.

Calligraphy master with Rex Hausmann in Beijing,
China at the Temple of the Sun

________________________________________________________________________________

Signs…  Jimmy Greenfield
We live in a visual world of signs that guide, dictate, and define social norms.
Many of these are culturally specific, but others are universally understood
and form the basis of a symbolic language readable the world over.  The signs
depicted in this show are meant as warnings about the effects of unbridled
population growth that puts ever-increasing pressure on shrinking natural
resources, the wholesale and indiscriminate destruction of the environment,
and the inevitability of human conflict that will follow. Constructed on
desiccated earth, they are meant to inspire meditation about the future with
the hope that by doing so, humans will somehow rise above their differences
and recognize the extreme challenges ahead.  This “evolution of human spirit
and cooperation” is the only process through which we will be able to ensure
and maintain the survival of the living planet.
Jimmy Greenfield, WARNING 2, 2009
dirt, sticks, dried grass, wire
30 x 30 x 3 inches

______________________________________________________________________________

Artists in Resonance selected for this exhibition are Gina Adams, TR Ericsson,
Matthew Farley, Jane Flanders, John Hachmeister, Elden Tefft, Maria Velasco,
Baruch Vergara, and Shannon White.

Gina Adams, Lace, Bead, Fabric Landscape .3,
Encaustic and oil on panel, 14″ x 20″, 2009
John Hachmeister, Dust, Rise Rain, Ceramic
John Hachmeister, Dust Rise Rain, Ceramic
Matthew Farley, Icarus Bound, Photodocumentation of Guerilla Installtion over Charles Umlauf's Icarus Sculpture
Matthew Farley, Icarus Bound, Photo documentation
of Guerrilla Installation on Charles Umlauf’s Icarus
Sculpture, 2010More images from Artists In Resonance for Earth: Language and Symbols

________________________________________________________________________________
ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

Rex Hausmann works as a full-time artist in San Antonio, Texas, and
New York City. He currently works in his family’s warehouses, home to
Hausmann Millworks: A Creative Community. Hausmann received a
bachelor of fine arts from the Savannah College of Art and Design. In
Atlanta, Hausmann studied under international artists Sandy Skoglund
and Patrick Dougherty. Hausmann has worked on projects and lectured
both nationally and internationally. His work and large projects often
revolve around identities found in communal and domestic contexts,
tracing their connections to religion and history. Hausmann credits
brother and musician Erik Hausmann as a major influence.
Since moving to NYC in the late 1970’s, Jimmy Greenfield has been
an avid sculptor, percussionist, environmentalist, and citizen activist
committed to community affairs.  In the late 1990’s, his sculpture
became more politically charged dealing specifically with issues of the
environment and human conflict.  To this end, in 2006, he created
Soapbox Gallery, a free street side public art venue in Brooklyn, NY
dedicated to inspiring and promoting uncensored socially relevant
work with a strong political narrative.
ABOUT THE CURATOR:

Darin M. White is an artist and independent curator based in
Lawrence, Kansas.  With his wife Shannon, a painter and arts advocate
they founded b.a.l.m. (beauty, art & life movement). Together they
promote creativity and action, and encouraging others in their art and
understanding. White continues to expand his artistic medium including:
sculpture, installation, printmaking, drawing, producing/ curating/
juroring exhibitions and writing art reviews and articles. His love and
awe of life and people are intertwined and explored in these various
avenues.
This is exhibition is brought to you by:
__________________________________________________________________________________
Cara and Cabezas Contemporary
1714 Holmes Street, Kansas City, Missouri, 64108,
816.332.6239
, gallery@caraandcabezas.com
OPEN First Friday 6 – 9 pm, Saturdays 11 – 5 pm
and By Appointment Tuesday – Friday
__________________________________________________________________________________
View gallery information about exhibition:
http://caraandcabezas.com/exhibitions_future.html

Facebook Invitation: http://www.facebook.com/events/158418277600551/


b.a.l.m.
| beauty, art and life movement
email
http://beautyartandlifemovement.org
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Follow us on:

LinkedIn Logo shortened

balm is a non profit organization working on 501-3C Status.
If you or an organization or business would like to donate funds, time or
other resources to further art and artists in Lawrence, KS and throughout
the country please send any correspondence to us or donate by clicking the
link below.

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Backstory Biography and All That KC Jazz

September 16, 2007

                                               by Shannon White                 

                  

                 Shannon revisiting her familial jazz roots at the KC Museum of 
                 Jazz – Sept 2007

                  IMG_8421
                  IMG_8417IMG_8416IMG_8413
                  
                   KC Jazz sculpture outside of museum 18th & Vine

    

     High school year book entry for Ralph C Wentz, 
     Shannon’s Grandfather & Jazz Pianist

Two sides of the room sang bebop rhythms back and forth, repeated, then overlapping each other.  The groups waited while vocal and instrumental solos gave their spontaneous variations, then let the chorus respond.  We sang and listened through several sets, awaiting our turn to scat or hear to another soloist.  I reconnnected with my slightly unfamiliar familial jazz roots last June 2007 in Minneapolis, Minnesota at a an Artists Gathering called Via Affirmativa.  Dr. Kyle Gregory, a family man who works as a professional jazz musician in Italy — an amazing jazz musician, teacher and person — gave the multi-disciplinary group of artists brief history of jazz with improvisational performances,  an education on jazz scale construction, rhythm emphasis, and best of all scatting bebop group improvs with instrumental solos.  We were all involved no matter what our artistic background.  It was interactive and exciting, and made me want to try jazz piano or flute for the first time since I started learning in grade school through high school and beyond — I said “try”.  I was also inspired to sketch the trumpeter with the energetic marks traveling up his arched spine, through the bell of his horn, then activating the space around him as I have seen so many other artists do, not to mimic, but because that was simply what I envisioned.  The creative experience in Minneapolis also made me want to discover more about this personal and local history with jazz than I had for my eighth grade speech class on my grandfather and his jazz career years ago. I began to wonder why he chose jazz, what it was like to have his career during his lifetime and later carry it on with a family, how his piano playing was integrated into the American jazz scene altogether and the regional KC scene as well.  This quest involved online research, interviewing my father and thinking about what made jazz spread from America throughout the world as a truly American art form.

               

           Bix Beiderbecke and his gang, which often changed players

Apparently, jazz began in New Orleans at the turn of the twentieth century, as a culmination of African, Spanish, Italian, South American and French cultures.  The blues and marching band style combination with spontaneous music with syncopated “rag time” rhythms traveled up from the seaport town.  The Mississippi River carried African American and Caucasian musicians looking for better futures in Chicago, Illinois, making it the new center for jazz by 1920.   Jazz had always been in my grandfather’s blood.  My grandfather, Ralph C Wentz was born in Ottawa, Illinois, not too far from Chicago in July 7,1909.  He took piano lessons as a child paid for by his grandmother, and took his first piano job playing for silent movies in his father’s silent movie house in Geneseo, Illinois, which is where he grew up.  He then played ragtime in the band his father, Ralph Sr. and Uncle Harry Wentz formed and played in the area.  He studied piano at the Sheridan Institute of Music in Chicago in the early 1930s and then was hired by a piano company in Chicago.  America was in a great period of prosperity at this time, and the country was celebrating with jazz.  No doubt my grandfather was caught up in this progressive American sound and couldn’t resist the proximity or the excitement.  His Uncle Harry was the a pianist for one of the first caucasian jazz bands, Bix Biederbecke , in the quad cities on bordering Illinois and Iowa.  My grandfather ended up filling in for Uncle Harry occasionally at the stool, and ended up playing for Al Capone and at a nunnery, inadvertantly, at one point.  When he realized Capone was actually hiring him, he politely bowed out of these assignments.  I believe an ailing grandmother was mentioned.

                         

                           Where Wentz performed and met his bride-to-be

Chicago hosted the World Fair 1933-34 to showcase an age of progress and technical achievement, while it drew from the past achievements as well.  One of the exhibits at this fair was a jazz pianist playing his newest spontaneous styles of American jazz on a crystal piano turning on a pedestal.  My grandmother, Mary Elizabeth Alleman, visited the world’s fair and began to fall in love with the man playing the piano at the time.  He was to become my grandfather when they would meet again eleven years later in Junction City, KS, where she taught and he was stationed for the war.  He played with many bands during the “big band” or “swing” era in the USO, country clubs and VFW around World War ll, bands like Jimmy Dorsey, Tommy Dorsey, Glenn Miller, Woody Herman, and Les Brown’s Band of Renown in the 1940s.  These bands made records, named after the famous trumpet, clarinet or vocal soloist they featured.    My grandfather moved close to Kansas City along with the jazz migration with a severe stomach ulcer from dealing with snipers and leading raids in the war.  He was sent to a Colorado hospital and then home to Lansing to die with his wife and children, when his ulcer perforated, speeding up the process.  Fortunately, a young country doctor stopped the bleeding with a new procedure and saved his life.  He already had one child by 1949, when my father came along and made two, and there would be two more. 

         

   Tommy Dorsey’s big band, whom my grandfather played with occasionally

KC it was the next big town to be known for “swing” and then “bebop”.  In 1948, my grandfather had his own band in KC and played with other bands as well.  The war draft caused the “big bands” to form these more intimate bebop groups featuring group improvisations, as band members were sent overseas.  He played in the Charlie “Bird” Parker band a little, although my grandfather preferred the rhythm driven and amplified “big band” or “swing” sound to the bebop style.  The music style would travel to New York, but my grandfather moved his family to Leavenworth and stayed in the Midwest.  This was where he remained for the duration of his life.

                                   

                   He played with Charlie “Bird” Parker a few times

My father, a part-time clarinetist, teacher and musician, remembers hearing his father practicing hours into the night after his latest gig.  My grandmother played piano, cello and coronet, and was musical as well.  I remember hearing my grandfather practice or play at dining establishments long after his career was largely over due to failing health.  Around 1948 he had started a piano tuning business, becoming the Piano Tuners’ Guild President in Kansas City in 1952.  During this year, my grandmother was sick with what was initially thought to be leukemia, and grandfather prayed at the chapel each day for her to recover, which she did.  He also appraised property in his small business and continued learning piano at the KC Conservatory of Music, where he shared some classes with Jay McShann. 

My grandmother would “deedle-dee-dee” around their historic house and dance with her finger to jazz on the radio, smiling at bygone memories and enjoying the moment, as she swept the floor after the hungry relatives, dog, two cats.  I was one of the silent grandkids who looked on amusedly, knowing that my grandmother did not like to clean.  After all those years, she still found joy in reliving those moments she spent with my grandfather while participating in the jazz culture firsthand.  She was always a progressive and people-oriented person herself.  Grandpa managed to live as a stable, loving husband and family man, father of four children, and maintain his jazz career through most of his life.  My grandmother always loved him and adored his music while she continued her teaching.

There was one other time I felt especially close to my grandfather after he was gone. As I sat in KC’s famous Jardine’s during a live jazz set with my husband and some friends, I turned my head towards the piano player almost expecting to see Grandpa Wentz sitting at the bench but seeing Joe Cartwright, instead.  His piano playing sounded just like my grandfather’s as I remembered hearing it.  His “bossa nova” La Luna Negra CD is my closest memento to a recording of my grandfather.  I found from my father that my grandfather tutored and mentored Joe Cartwright, a contemporary KC jazz legend, when he was young in a time when many parents discouraged their children from learning the jazz style over the classical styles.  At least one of my grandfather’s later students worked in lessons with my grandfather against the better judgement of their parents.  Maybe the newness, ethnic diversity, and working class roots of the music instilled fear in some people, as many creative, progressive movements do, that it would somehow make them less respectable or taint their morals merely by association.  Another student of my grandfather’s who is still playing the jazz circuit successfully all over the world is Gary Foster, who my grandfather introduced to his Leavenworth jazz trio, after gaining permission from his Gary’s parents to include him.  Gary Foster played at the Topeka Jazz Workshop Sunday, September 16th, and I would have liked to attend.  People say the Grandpa Wentz also sounds a lot like Oscar Peterson, one of his contemporaries in Canada.  I will have to give him a listen, now that I am on the jazz trail.

That innovation and collaborative combination of backgrounds which formed jazz are what make it so exciting to perform and listen to still, and are possibly the reason the rest of the world still listens to it, today.  Besides, Thomas More might say that a county’s character is defined by its everyday “rustics”, as they perform tasks, and as they celebrate life.  Jazz may have seen infamous moments, but it inspires me to collaborate with other artists, be a part in the fabric of life in my local community,  to let my art be an extension of my life experiences and past and present surroundings,  to be bold in my creativity,  to celebrate life expressively, to teach my children to always be innovative, to encourage others in their artistic pursuits, to spend more time enjoying the still organic KC jazz scene, to sing while I clean and to share this wonderful short classic cartoon called I LOVE TO SINGA produced by WB Merrie Melodies in 1936.  The film captures the tension between jazz and classical music in its emergence, resistance to new underground styles and a little human nature.  I love the happy ending.

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